Celtic Pagan History

ONLINE CLASSROOM

UNDERGRADUATE  |  FIRST DEGREE  |  HIS101  |  7 CREDIT HOURS  |  GRADED

INSTRUCTORS:

Rev. E.J. Oaklore
Rt. Wor. Sis. Cathain MacCarthaigh

COURSE MENU:

ENROLLMENT FORM
WEEK 1
WEEK 2
WEEK 3
WEEK 4
WEEK 5
WEEK 6
WEEK 7
WEEK 8

COURSE DESCRIPTION

An exploration of the Indo-European and Celtic history of Paganism in three principle periods; the Paleopagan, the Mesopagan, and the Neopagan eras,  together with an examination of the influences from all three periods on modern reconstructionist and revivalist Neopaganism.  This course looks at the peoples of Pre-Christian Indo-Europe, Britain, Gaul, and Ireland; how they lived, how they fought, and how they died.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

During this course, students will:

  • Gain an understanding of the three principle eras of Celtic Pagan history; Paleopagan, Mesopagan, Neopagan; and what defines them.
  • Explore the Paleopagan era in order to gain a familiarity with the timeline of Celtic history from the Stone Age up to the 17th Century C.E. and the dawn of Mesopaganism.  Students will become familiar with the Classical commentators from whom a great deal of the written evidence of the ancient Celts and Druids is drawn, along with an understanding of the migration, ethnic influences, artistic expression, lifestyle, culture, and beliefs of the ancient Celtic peoples of Indo-Europe, Britain, Gaul, and Ireland.
  • Explore the Mesopagan era and learn how Freemasonry, Thelma, together  with the Hermetic and Theosophical movements influenced revivalist Paganism (esp. Druidry Witchcraft / Wicca) from the 17th through the early 20th centuries, C.E.
  • Finally, we will explore the Neopagan era with an examination of some of the founders of modern Neopagan traditions, including Ross Nichols, Gerald Garder, Isaac Bonewits, Caroline High Correll, Alex Sanders, Philip Carr-Gomm, among others, and how those traditions have evolved to the present day.

SPIRITUALITY SEGMENT

Each week of class will end with a segment focusing on a Spirituality-based topic relating to Druidic-Wiccan belief and cosmology.  The aim is to increase the student’s understanding of how the lessons of history shape the way we worship and practice our spirituality in our daily lives.  Concepts include Nine Holy Things: Three Kindred, Three Worlds, Three Realms; the Celtic spiral of existence, Primary Progression, and; the Harmony of Wicca and Druidry and the connection points between the two traditions.

READINGS

Defining Paganism: Paeo-, Meso, and Neo, Isaac Bonewits
Indo-European Caste Systems and Cosmologies, Isaac Bonewits
Indo-European Paleopaganism and its Clergy, Isaac Bonewits
A Very Brief History of Mesopagan Druidism, Isaac Bonewits
The Druid Order, Dr. Thomas Maughan, D.Sc.
Earth Consciousness Reborn, E.J. OakLore
The Druid Path, E.J. OakLore
The Harmony of Wicca and Druidry, E.J. OakLore

FURTHER READING

Green, Miranda J. The World of the Druids. London: Thames & Hudson, 1997.
Carr-Gomm, Philip. Druidcraft: The Magic of Wicca and Druidry. London: Thorsons, 2002.


 

WEEK 1

  • Introduction
  • Defining Paleopaganism, Mesopaganism, Neopaganism
  • Spirituality:
    • Developing a topical, daily devotional practice

WEEK 2

  • The Paleopagan era:
    • The ancient Celtic timeline, Stone Age to the Le Tene period
  • Spirituality:
    • Introduction to Nine Holy concepts; Three Kindred, Three Worlds, Three Realms
    • The Celtic “spiral of existence” and “Primary Progression”

WEEK 2 FURTHER READING:

Indo-European Caste Systems and Cosmologies, Isaac Bonewits
Indo-European Paleopaganism and its Clergy, Isaac Bonewits


WEEK 3

  • The Paleopagan era:
    • The ancient Celtic timeline; Celtic invasion of Rome to the Norman invasion of Britain.
  • Spirituality:
    • Exploring the Three Kindred


 

ENROLLMENT FORM

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